December: Looking Back

Our goal for our 2016 Zero Carbon project was to learn, to tweak, and to make a plan for larger changes.

What we learned:

We can make a massive difference to our own carbon footprint through physical changes to our house, how we get around, and through our purchasing choices. It requires institutional change, too. For example, Alberta still uses coal for electricity generation, which increases our own carbon footprint. As coal use is phased out by 2030, our carbon footprint from electricity will drop massively.

What we tweaked:

To reduce electricity use, we replaced the freezer with a smaller and more efficient model, bought a drying rack to reduce dryer use by about a quarter, replaced lights with LEDS (for an 80% reduction in power use), and tweaked the use and arrangement of air filters.

To reduce natural gas use, we turned down the water heater, fixed leaks around windows, replaced a door sweep, and filled odd gaps. We are still working on insulting the basement where the wood of the house sits on the cement foundation, caulking behind the baseboards in the back entry, and finding a better dryer vent.

To reduce secondary carbon production, we reduced garbage and increased recycling, planted a tree which promptly died (we’ll try again this spring), changed driving habits to increase fuel efficiency, tried to waste less food, and ate more local food, and more vegan and vegetarian meals.

Our results:

The model to measure our carbon footprint we used last year has been revamped and comes up with totally different numbers, so there’s no way to compare this year’s numbers with last year’s. We do have some hard numbers for fuel use.

We thought we were driving more because of some lifestyle changes, but in fact our mileage is lower. Our total fuel use is down 17%. That’s mostly coincidental to our zero carbon project, not earned.

Our electricity use for 2016 resulted in 7.15 tonnes of carbon creation. If we were in BC it would be 1.28 tonnes. That’s the difference between more hydro vs. more coal as a source for electricity production. That means an electric car is not our next best purchase, and neither is replacing our gas furnace with a heat exchanger. Our natural gas use released 4.19 tonnes of carbon.

Our natural gas use decreased by 7%, and electricity by 12%, for 2016 compared to 2015. Many of the changes were done part way through the year. Our estimates for a full year after all changes are completed are 15% for natural gas, and 20% for electricity.

The total cost for the work was a little under $1000. A third of that was for an assessment. We deliberately looked for the easy and inexpensive changes to start with. After this, the price goes up.

What we’ll do next:

  1. We have some house sealing jobs to finish.
  1. As appliances die, we’ll replace them with best in class for energy efficiency.We’d get about a 50% drop in electricity use by switching all appliances to best in class.
  1. We’ll keep watching for developments with solar panels and solar tiles. If we get hit with a damaging hail storm, that might be when we buy, either solar tiles or panels to mount on a newly shingled roof.
  1. We’ll watch government taxes and subsidies, using them to move a little faster.

We’ve had a lot of fun with our zero carbon project, learned a lot, were constantly surprised, and are pleased with what we’ve accomplished. We’ll continue to make changes, but not to blog monthly. We’ll post irregularly, when something interesting comes up. If the work we’ve done inspires some changes at your place, let us know. We’ll cheer you on.

Maureen and Mark

April: Gear and Habits

In April we researched more stuff. We feel nibbled to death by wee bits of information. It is vastly complex trying to sort out personal behavior and purchasing changes. We found two really good sources of information:

book: How Bad Are Bananas: The Carbon Footprint of Everything, by Mike Berners-Lee

website: http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/refrigerators.html

We’ve redone our graph to add what our appliance use would be if we had the most efficient appliances. Blue is our estimated electricity use. Red is the most energy efficient currently available, best of class, according to Natural Resources Canada:

http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/pml-lmp/index.cfm?action=app.welcome-bienvenue

This website is our best find of the month. If you’re looking at new appliances, start here to find the best in class in power use. As always, we’ve found the numbers hard to pin down. We’ve decided the appropriate word for our accuracy is squishy.Electrical_BestinClass

Huge improvements are possible. However – and this is the big however – a new fridge takes carbon to create, so replacing a not-ancient still functioning fridge is actually not an improvement carbon-wise. It’s better to take care of appliances, keep them running well, and replace them when they’re truly dead. Unless it’s really old, like our really old freezer. That one is worth replacing.

We found a new one, finally. It was a pain, searching. Sears doesn’t list Kwh for their freezers in-store, on-line, or anyplace the saleswoman could look. We searched on-line and found most retailers didn’t. Trail had two options, with energuide information, but neither are high efficiency. We ended up scoring at the local London Drugs which happened to have the model we wanted in stock, on sale. The new one is best of class, and much more efficient than the old one. It’s also about 30% smaller.

Our washer tested at better than best of class, even though it’s old. It’s a front loader and highly efficient.

We use a portable air conditioner on the hot days, because Maureen needs filtered cool air when it’s hot and her lungs are unhappy. We’d wondered if central air would be a better choice – it’s not. And it turns out our current portable air conditioner is best in class. We try to reduce our use of it, by shutting blinds during the day and cooling the house at night. We have lots of trees to help cut heat gain, but on the really hot days the air conditioner is working hard. The furnace and air conditioning numbers really drive home the importance of good insulation and sealing leaks.

However, the furnace fan numbers are suspect – both our current estimate and best of class. Our furnace is high efficiency and newish (installed 2013). We’re not sure what’s going on there.

The dryer, fridge, stove and dishwasher will be replaced with best of class as they die.

The other stuff we’ll pick away at where we see opportunities. We’re shuffling power bars to reduce vampire power for older gear like the stereo. We’re becoming more careful about turning off lights and looking for other ways to make small changes.

Overall: between the new freezer, the drying rack (for a 30% reduction in dryer use), and switching to LED lights next month, we’re looking at about a 20% drop in our electricity use. Switching all appliances to best of class would be about 50%. We’ll aim for that with future purchases. And we’ll keep working on other gear and bad habits. Of course, the biggest impact will be when Alberta stops using coal to generate electricity ­- this is a huge source of carbon. So advocacy is important, too.

May will be all about lights as we switch to LEDs.