December: Looking Back

Our goal for our 2016 Zero Carbon project was to learn, to tweak, and to make a plan for larger changes.

What we learned:

We can make a massive difference to our own carbon footprint through physical changes to our house, how we get around, and through our purchasing choices. It requires institutional change, too. For example, Alberta still uses coal for electricity generation, which increases our own carbon footprint. As coal use is phased out by 2030, our carbon footprint from electricity will drop massively.

What we tweaked:

To reduce electricity use, we replaced the freezer with a smaller and more efficient model, bought a drying rack to reduce dryer use by about a quarter, replaced lights with LEDS (for an 80% reduction in power use), and tweaked the use and arrangement of air filters.

To reduce natural gas use, we turned down the water heater, fixed leaks around windows, replaced a door sweep, and filled odd gaps. We are still working on insulting the basement where the wood of the house sits on the cement foundation, caulking behind the baseboards in the back entry, and finding a better dryer vent.

To reduce secondary carbon production, we reduced garbage and increased recycling, planted a tree which promptly died (we’ll try again this spring), changed driving habits to increase fuel efficiency, tried to waste less food, and ate more local food, and more vegan and vegetarian meals.

Our results:

The model to measure our carbon footprint we used last year has been revamped and comes up with totally different numbers, so there’s no way to compare this year’s numbers with last year’s. We do have some hard numbers for fuel use.

We thought we were driving more because of some lifestyle changes, but in fact our mileage is lower. Our total fuel use is down 17%. That’s mostly coincidental to our zero carbon project, not earned.

Our electricity use for 2016 resulted in 7.15 tonnes of carbon creation. If we were in BC it would be 1.28 tonnes. That’s the difference between more hydro vs. more coal as a source for electricity production. That means an electric car is not our next best purchase, and neither is replacing our gas furnace with a heat exchanger. Our natural gas use released 4.19 tonnes of carbon.

Our natural gas use decreased by 7%, and electricity by 12%, for 2016 compared to 2015. Many of the changes were done part way through the year. Our estimates for a full year after all changes are completed are 15% for natural gas, and 20% for electricity.

The total cost for the work was a little under $1000. A third of that was for an assessment. We deliberately looked for the easy and inexpensive changes to start with. After this, the price goes up.

What we’ll do next:

  1. We have some house sealing jobs to finish.
  1. As appliances die, we’ll replace them with best in class for energy efficiency.We’d get about a 50% drop in electricity use by switching all appliances to best in class.
  1. We’ll keep watching for developments with solar panels and solar tiles. If we get hit with a damaging hail storm, that might be when we buy, either solar tiles or panels to mount on a newly shingled roof.
  1. We’ll watch government taxes and subsidies, using them to move a little faster.

We’ve had a lot of fun with our zero carbon project, learned a lot, were constantly surprised, and are pleased with what we’ve accomplished. We’ll continue to make changes, but not to blog monthly. We’ll post irregularly, when something interesting comes up. If the work we’ve done inspires some changes at your place, let us know. We’ll cheer you on.

Maureen and Mark

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May: Light Switches

May was all about lights. First we did our research. Tomsguide has more than we ever wanted to know about light bulbs (pricing is US).

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/light-bulb-guide,review-1986.html

LEDs are vastly better than the alternatives, except they are more expensive. But they last forever, so it doesn’t matter unless you switch them all at once, like we did. They are the most efficient, longest lasting, and have none of the concerns about mercury (CFL) or damage to art work (halogen).

We replaced our most-used incandescents with LEDs. We didn’t replace all bulbs – this gets complicated. LEDs are not recommended for enclosed light fixtures, we couldn’t find replacement for every bulb size, and LEDs are weird with dimmers. We took the odd bulb sizes to the hardware store, and a wonderfully knowledgeable woman helped us work through the options for each. We bought 13 bulbs for $98.54. We’ll switch out halogens as they burn out over the next year. They’re more efficient than incandescents, but not nearly as good as LEDs, and short lived.

We decided to test our new LEDs using the electric meter on our house. We turned off everything but the lights, and recorded the meter disk spinning.

We couldn’t get our base consumption to zero without unplugging every device in the house, so we also measured ghost power consumption, and subtracted that number from our other measurements. As usual, our accuracy is not very. Mark liked this website for figuring out the calculations:

https://staff.washington.edu/corey/power.html

Our ghost power consumption was 122.3 watts. Incandescents to be changed consumed 559.8 W. LEDs in the same fixtures consumed 103.1 W, an 80% drop in consumption.

Mark made a video of our electricity meter running with the new LEDs compared to the old incandescents. Maureen laughs every time she watches what he did with it.

Press here for the video.

Between the LED lights, the drying rack, and the new freezer, we’re hoping for about a 20% drop in our electricity use.

Next month? It’s time to talk gardening.